eye (2007-06)

More Wine, More Art, Just More More More

Clothing as Art

Tear It Down

Awesome

More Wine, More Art, Just More More More

That night we all saw Dirty Knees play rock music the way it should be played: loud and steady. "You can't trust UTK... you can't trust the USA!" They shouted it, they meant it--they believe it. Dirty Knees, along with others, are creating the New Knoxville Scene . Bands like these are bringing us out, which means they are bringing us together. Now the flag has been raised, and there is no turning back.

Nor do I hear in my imagination the parts successively, I hear them all at once. What a delight this is! All this inventing, this producing, takes place in a pleasing, lively dream.

Emancipate the dissonance!

Clothing as Art

Using brightly-colored food packaging materials and other recycled wares or waste, Ries produced a whimsical collection of costumery demonstrating a passion for dragons, life-size carrots, ocean-dwellers, and inventive accessories. Think of it as haute couture Halloween attire for the impossibly creative.

Highlights of the event included an impromptu "runway" walk down the length of the restaurant by the models--including Ries' own mother--and a full-body tail flap by mer-woman Claire Jamieson as she lay on display across the center table.  

The collection, along with the artist's statement, will be on   display at the Tomato Head   through the month of February. Check out the bathrooms while you're there; the walls are canvas to one of Ries' other numerous talents: painting.

Tear It Down

General Manager Sean Blair (who also works with Patrick Sullivan's and Backroom BBQ) said it took a while to get all the right permits to begin modifying the 1906 structure, but once they did, everything just fell into place.

The majority of the wall remains intact, with two entryways and some open viewing windows leading into the new game room, complete with pool tables and dart boards. What we love best about the new room, however, is the wall-to-wall map of--you guessed it--Manhattan. Dated between 1939 and 1942, the hand-painted canvas once graced the walls of a gentlemen's club in New York City before finding its way to a Knoxville antique store.

Along with the new look, the bar boasts a new food menu, an updated sound system, and a new musical line-up of both weekly and one-off live performances. Next time you're down in the Old City, check it out. Or better yet, make a special trip.

Awesome

Behind him were two musicians who have been active in the Knoxville scene for years. Cain Blanchard (bassist for Black Sarah and Haggis ) and Jason Stark (drummer for Woman ) made the trip. Regina Greene , of Front Porch Productions here in Knoxville, was instrumental in bringing two of Knoxville's finest on stage with a living legend.

There was no heat in the Skull Lab, and it was well below freezing in Cincinnati. The set began with a droning number, the kind of single-note wail that Rhys is known for. Then, the power went out. Stark continued to play the same beat, over and over in the darkness. When the audience's eyes adjusted to the darkness, as one concertgoer describes it, it became clear that everyone kept playing, sans electricity until the juice kicked back on.

Rhys Chatham lives in Paris. He could be happy playing only a few gigs a year, yet he continues to book shows like this, playing to small crowds of experimental music fans. We're glad Knoxville was a part of it. Blanchard and Stark, be proud. And thank you both. Go see Stark play with Woman this Friday, Feb. 9, at the World Grotto.