eye (2006-18)

Knoxaroo

Former Judybat Flies into K-Town

Local Album Review:

Knoxaroo

But those are the exact circumstances under which AC Entertainment reminds us, each year, that it’s got Knoxville’s back. The festival’s two café stages are miniaturized versions of the real deal, designed to give up-and-coming artists a chance to shake what they got in front of the masses. And of this year’s café lineup, which includes 30 acts from around the country (and one from Germany), 10 names ring a bell as choice-cut local performers. The Knoxville-fried list reads as follows: Artvandalay , Garage Deluxe , Gypsy Hands Tribal Belly Dancers , Hector Qirko Band , Leslie Woods and Dark Mountain Orchid , Mitch Rutman Group , Nug Jug , Phil Pollard & his Band of Humans , The Rockwells , and Tim Lee Band

Thanks, AC, for supporting the scene. And to the performers who’ll be representing the ’sphere, don’t forget to drink plenty of water, wear sunscreen, and savor the feeling of that $184.50 comp ticket in your pocket.

Former Judybat Flies into K-Town

Since breaking with the megapopular Knoxville pop-rock act, The Judybats in ’92 and eventually settling in Washington D.C., Stutz has kept up with our city by reading MP online (yeah!) and chatting with old friends like Todd Steed . Explaining his current band’s upcoming appearance at Barley’s this Friday, Stutz jokes, “It’s all Todd’s fault. He comes up here pretty frequently, and we made a deal that if we got them to play up here, we would come play down there.”

Stutz is especially excited to see the fruits of downtown’s redevelopment, and we’re guessing he’ll be pretty flabbergasted. “I’m looking forward to seeing all the changes,” he says. “It’s good for a town like that because Knoxville never really knew how to be. It was like it was always beating itself up. Building up and then knocking itself down.”

Stutz’s new band, The High Signs , has a few jangly rock tunes you can check out on www.thehighsigns.com . “This band is much more straight rock than The Judybats ever were,” says Stutz. “It’s a three-piece, which automatically makes it a little rougher-sounding.”

Though he’s more than happy with life in D.C., his marriage and his job at the Library of Congress, Stutz—like any true Knoxvillian at heart—gets a little nostalgic for the good ole days. “The Judybats were always a little ill-fated I think,” he says. “But I’ll listen to those old records when I get drunk sometimes and get all morose. I wouldn’t trade in those days for anything.”

The High Signs are set to play with Todd Steed and the Suns of Phere this Friday, May 5, at 90.3’s weekly Funhouse Show at Barley’s. Listeners should come expecting a raucous night of reminiscence and music. “We’re just about making people rock,” says Stutz. “In today’s world, with all the crap going on, you need as much rock as you can get.”

Local Album Review:

The radio single “Axe and My Ratchet” comes rumbling from the band’s gut, led by Stevie Jones’ soulful keyboarding and his old-school rock, cigarette-ravaged voice. The song “Stanky” has a pleasant little hooky melody, though it becomes repetitive over the five-minute duration of the song. The band chills out with “Long Time,” a guitar and piano ballad that retains that wistful hungover swagger of a road-weary rocker. Some of the tracks are more psychedelically flavored, reflecting several members’ backgrounds in jammier acts. But for the most part, these dudes stick with the hard stuff—a great accompaniment for swiggin’ a beer, smokin’ Reds and ashing them on the floor—of the garage, naturally.

Pick up the disc at Disc Exchange and catch Garage DeLuxe at their CD release show with The Avett Brothers this Friday, May 5, at Blue Cats, as part of the Old City’s Cinco de Mayo Pub Crawl. Get into all Old City venues for just $5.