ear (2006-41)

Want a Sticker?

Candy Anyone?

Turnout a Worry?

Full of Beans

Vote Next Week

Which Road?

Bug in Our Ear

Want a Sticker?

African-American tourists passing through town knew who he was and offered beaming congratulations.

Ford noted he has been advocating splitting Iraq into three provinces of like-minded constituencies throughout his campaign and there are reports out of Washington this week the Iraq commission headed by Bush family friend and former Secretary of State James Baker may present partitioning of Iraq as one alternative. The report to Congress won’t be delivered until after the election. 

Candy Anyone?

Turnout a Worry?

The Republican primary, won by state Rep. David Davis , pretty much decided the congressional race, so interest in the general will be low. There also isn’t any groundswell among Republicans to go out and vote against popular conservative Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen . The negativity in the Republican primary (and the loss of conservative candidate Ed Bryant ) has dampened interest in the Senate race.

A Republican running in a statewide race in Tennessee traditionally needs a huge vote east of the Cumberland Plateau in order to be competitive.

Full of Beans

Vote Next Week

On Oct. 31, Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 the hours will be extended to 8 p.m. with two additional locations. The additional locations are the Knoxville Expo Center on Clinton Highway and University Center on Cumberland Ave.

Election Day is Tuesday Nov. 7.

Which Road?

The story is about a man and his son traveling across an American post-nuclear wasteland. Roads, hills, cities, and even the sea that’s the travelers’ destination are described without name. Reviewers have attempted to nail down the journey’s route.

A Village Voice reviewer assumed the novel was set in the Southwest, as many of McCarthy’s novels are, and that the pair arrived at the Pacific Ocean. However, Kennedy thinks they’re on their way to the Gulf, by way of Lookout Mountain.

Local McCarthy experts are convinced that the pair are on their way via the Carolina Piedmont—and that on the way, McCarthy describes a ruined Knoxville. From a city of interstate exchanges, the father crosses “the high concrete bridge over the river” within sight of docks, sunken pleasure boats, and smokestacks downstream, to find “an old frame house with chimneys and gables and a stone wall,” in the text the house where the father grew up.  

McCarthy, now a 72-year-old New Mexican, spent much of his first 45 years in the Knoxville area. A few weeks ago, he returned home for a reunion at Catholic High. He grew up south of the river, in a house still standing on Martin Mill Pike, which answers the description in the new book.