ear (2006-15)

He Did What?

New Faces Sought

Stark Contrast

Hatespeech at Farragut

Si Se Puede

Some Funnini Now

Bug in Our Ear

He Did What?

Padgett called his office to confirm the information and was heard to ask, “What is that idiot doing? He works for me!” The lawsuit could indeed result in Padgett being ousted from office, and Gray works in the clerk’s office.

New Faces Sought

Candidates named by the political party that have a track record and some name recognition stand a better chance of winning in the general election. Some of the “new faces” we’ve heard that are being solicited to run include Steve Hunley , Madeline Rogero , Julia Tucker , Ed Shouse , Nick Pavlis and Brian Hornback .

Stark Contrast

County Mayor Mike Ragsdale ’s most admired person? Ronald Reagan . Challenger Steve Hall ’s most admired person? Ronald Reagan.

Ragsdale’s favorite songs include “Amazing Grace” and “Rocky Top.” Hall’s favorites include “Amazing Grace” and “Rocky Top.”

Hall’s favorite vacation spot is Myrtle Beach, S.C. Ragsdale’s favorite vacation spot, by contrast, is South Carolina beaches.

Hatespeech at Farragut

“Something needs to be done,” Snow wrote on Feb. 28. “There’s something missing in an educational system where students so casually and comfortably express their disdain for others. ‘Character Counts’ is clearly falling short when it comes to racism and prejudice. I would like to hear from you.”

She heard back immediately from Ragsdale, who she says “seemed genuinely upset,” and then from school board Chair Dan Murphy and Farragut Principal Mike Reynolds , but as of this week, she has not yet heard a word from Superintendent Lindsey himself, to whom she sent the letter.

Snow, who believes the subject has not been adequately attended to, will address the Knox County school board on behalf of the Knoxville Jewish Alliance at their meeting on Monday, April 17, at 5 p.m.

Si Se Puede

Waving flags and pumping fists in the air, chanting in response to megaphone-wielding leaders, mostly in Spanish, to the rhythm of snare drums, and wearing colorful shirts asking, in both languages, “Where are our rights?,” they demonstrated a passion rarely seen here. Monday’s demonstration, punctuated by the chant, “Si, Se Puede” (“Yes, we can”) looked something like a revolution. Which may be why security guards prudently closed the iron gates to the courtyard of the federal building.

Subsequent news reports show the challenges of assessing the size of a crowd. Organizers estimated the crowd in front of the City County Building at about 2,500, a figure also reported in the News Sentinel .

However, WBIR-TV estimated it at “over 1,000.” The Daily Beacon and WUOT-FM estimated the same crowd at only 800. 

Metro Pulse had two reporters on the scene; back in the office, they disagreed about the crowd’s size. One thought it was about 1,000, another 3-4,000.

So take your pick. But it was a lot of people. Which may make May 1 even more impressive. That’s when some Latino workers are reportedly planning a one-day strike; it may take that for us to realize how dependent Anglos are on them. 

Some Funnini Now

Some were disappointed the street music seemed spottier than in years past, with some long gaps of silence at more than one of the stages. There were some complaints that some dogs on leashes were overlooked while others were firmly ejected, along with their leashed owners.

The eight Roman centurions, though lacking a promised horse, livened up the streets, chanting march steps in Latin, more in keeping with the festival’s Italian theme than the Confederate platoon did last year.

Ushers welcomed customers to the Tennessee Theatre, promising warmth, and had a full house for the UT Opera’s spirited production of The Most Happy Fella .