Photos by Shawn Poynter

  • HAUNTED HOUSE: This dilapidated shack on a hill captured Amy Greene’s attention as she drove past it week after week on the way to her sister’s house. She started imagining a story as to how the house got that way. The story became her first novel, Bloodroot.
  • As a child, Amy Greene she spent her time roaming the hills behind the house and pacing the banks of creek nearby.
  • HOME SWEET HOME: Amy Greene’s parents still live in the modest white house that her grandfather built in Bulls Gap in 1944.
  • FRAMED–UP: Amy Greene’s Russellville home is decorated with prints of covers of famous novels, like To Kill a Mockingbird, as well as covers of her own two books.
  • Hardy Johnson, 85, has been repairing shoes and leather goods at Custom Shoe Rebuilders on Broadway for nearly 60 years. Johnson recently sold the story to his son, Jimmy, but still works at the store.
  • Sandi Sanders, owner of Le Caniche Rose Pet Spa & Boutique, brushes and grooms a minature poodle.
  • Charlene and Don Tillman, owners of Boyle’s Vacuum on Broadway, examine a vacuum cleaner before they repair it.
  • Working the counter, Greg Rodger, left, and Perry Pratt tend to customers.
  • Pratt’s Country Store is Fountain City’s best-known farmer’s market.
  • Organized in 1845, Smithwood Baptist Church is a Fountain City landmark. Its cemetery is the resting place of refugees from the 1876 yellow-fever epidemic in Memphis.
  • One of Knoxville’s most appealing oddities, Savage Garden. English-born industrialist Arthur Savage (1872-1946) whose marble-milling machinery factory was in downtown Knoxville, built this garden around 1917, inspired by Japanese examples during the art-nouveau period. He and his wife, Hortense, lived next door. After surviving a tornado and periods of neglect, the privately owned garden has recently been renovated.
  • Two skateboarders enjoy Fountain City Skatepark, opened in 2010 on the corner of Maple Drive and Knox Road.
  • Garden Montessori School, which offers a toddler through 8th-grade program, is named for Savage Garden, which is next door.
  • Danae Oglesby (center) helps Pat Muncy with her precious-metal clay making at the Fountain City Art Center.
  • The Fountain City Art Center, along Hotel Avenue by Fountain City Park, hosts numerous amenities for both aspiring artists and art shoppers.
  • Hotel Avenue, named for the long-gone Fountain Head Hotel, hosts the Creamery Park Grille and other businesses. It once greeted passengers from the short-line train from Knoxville.
  • Holbrook Drive, alongside First Baptist Church, evokes the name of a teachers’ college that closed more than a century ago.
  • Samson Devine is one of many intrepid fishermen who match wits with Fountain City Lake, which really does host some sizeable fish.
  • Savage Garden
  • Heart-shaped Fountain City Lake, aka the duck pond, was built in the 1890s as an amenity for the luxurious resort known as Fountain Head Hotel, and is almost all that remains of that era.
  • A few older homes still overlook North Broadway.
  • SO CLOSE: Flying Anvil Theatre creative director Jayne Morgan and board member David Dwyer hope to not only bring edgier off-Broadway-style theater to Knoxville, but also help launch a mid-sized theater venue with an Indiegogo campaign intended to raise $100,000. The venue appeared in the form of developer Tim Hill’s new Jewel on North Gay Street—but the funding did not.
  • IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS: Gregory Spaw, an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Tennessee’s College of Architecture and Design,  designed a carbon fiber bottle opener with his brother Michael and put it on Kickstarter for production funds. Their campaign blew past its $2,400 goal in two days, eventually becoming “1217% Funded.” (Note: the Airstream trailer seen here is not the same one as Adam Crawford’s—this one’s part of a student project at UT.).
  • FIRST LADY OF PIES: Daley Mackey had already cornered the local market on gourmet fried pies, but she hasn’t been able to cook the pies on-site. So she turned to Kickstarter and discovered that at least 147 fried-pie lovers supported her plan to convert a trailer into a mobile kitchen—which she hopes to unveil in the spring.
  • Perhaps few soldiers were lucky enough to have women around to help with domestic chores of camp life. Many Union soldiers from both the North and South were motivated by love of flag and country. Top, from left: Keith Cornelius, Heather Cornelius,  and Pamela Mumma.
  • Warren Haire.
  • A few Unionists and fellow travelers kill time between explosions. Re-enactors are pretty strict about their period gear, but one Unionist officer appears to have some manner of electronic device at the ready, in case his sword fails him. Top, from left: Tyler Underwood, Mark Simpson, and Jeremy Ray.
  • Though the odds might have seemed to favor the Confederates—about 3,000 of whom were involved in the charge on the fort, manned by only about 440 Union soldiers—it was a disaster that ended the Knoxville campaign, and almost ended Gen. Longstreet’s military career.
  • Though it’s not a full-scale replica of Fort Sanders, this modern-day rebuild of a bastion of the fort, a permanent feature constructed about six years ago on the farm of Smiley Clapp, near Corryton, is based on original engineers’ specifications, and is as close as we’re ever likely to see.  Through telescopes, the Knoxville area’s largest fort didn’t look nearly as impregnable as it was.
  • The “Butternut Boys,” led by Roger Kelly.
  • The skirmishes surrounding the weeks-long siege of Knoxville, including the Battle of Campbell’s Station, along Kingston Pike in what’s now Farragut,  probably saw some similar scenes, with or without intrepid young women watching closely. Re-enactor groups the 79th N.Y. Tennessee, a local Union-renactor group based here, provided the bluecoats. The 63rd Tennessee is a local group of Confederate re-enactors who depicted Longstreet’s men.