Photos by David Luttrell

  • BUST A CAP: Jolley’s familiar busts, with their baseball caps and cartoonish expressions, are his most emblematic work, but they can make him seem like something less than a serious artist.
  • THE BUTLER DID IT: KMA director David Butler has overseen a major fund-raising campaign and renovation to prepare the museum for Richard Jolley’s “Cycle of Life,” a $1 million glass installation that will be unveiled in May. Butler says the new piece will elevate KMA to “a whole new level.”
  • JOLLEY GOOD: Richard Jolley has worked out of the same West Knoxville glass studio for almost 40 years. As the scale of his work and the size of his staff have gotten bigger, Jolley has become the city’s most celebrated and widely collected artist; his immediately recognizable work routinely sells for tens of thousands of dollars.
  • THCC volunteers and CACs make plenty of information available to people who attend enrollment events.
  • Carl Wheeler organized the THCC enrollment events, and volunteers at the ones held at Mount Calvary Baptist Church.
  • With the help of a CAC, Rena Reeve was able to get her family signed up for TennCare.
  • CAC Tonya Sweet explains the TennCare application to Hayden.
  • Stanley Madden wanted to make sure he signed up for the right plan to cover his wife and himself.
  • Volunteers hand out info sheets for people to fill out before speaking with Certified Application Counselors.
  • Sheila Hayden, who has a family history of diabetes and cancer, said she would visit the doctor as soon as she receives her TennCare card.
  • Emmitt Howard says he found stability at Minvilla, and friendship through the Circles of Support program.
  • James Maley recently celebrated his first anniversary as a Minvilla manor resident. He says he hopes to spend the rest of his life there.
  • COFFEE KLATCH: Sex Week UT organizers Jacob Clark (left) and Brianna Rader often meet at the Golden Roast coffeehouse near the UT campus.
  • The last building whose construction was witnessed by Calvin M. McClung himself, the 1911 building was also the last to remain standing. It was there until just this week. With JW Demolition in charge, it’s likely the tallest building ever demolished in downtown Knoxville.
  • The 1911 McClung addition, which survived the 2007 fire on its east, and the 2014 fire on its west, appeared for a few days as if it might be salvaged. However, when an engineering firm’s damage report suggested the possibility of collapse, and recommended either upper-floor stabilization, which would likely have been costly, or demolition, the city opted for the latter.
  • The youngest Knox Game Design member is 10-year-old Jacob Turnmire, who already has develop a few games with help from his dad, Jeffry. His entry in the Ludum Dare is Weird Kingdom, which seems to involve traveling through different settings trying to kill a despot who has gone mad in the wake of losing his kingdom. The game features flying bird-swords and other unexpected hazards.
  • Knox Game Design member Levi Smith is an Oak Ridge-based computer programmer who has designed “a few dozen games” in his spare time over the last several years.
  • Michael Neel is founder of the Technology Co-op and de facto head of Knox Game Design, a meet-up group for indie game developers.
  • MORTAL KOMBAT:  Members of Knox Game Designgather at the Technology Co-op in the Old City to engage in December’s Ludum Dare: a weekend-long competition to design a complete video game based around a theme revealed on a Friday night.
  • Game design partners Josh Ferguson and Forrest McCorkle.
  • SHOOT ‘EM UP: Game design partners Josh Ferguson and Forrest McCorkle’s first complete game was Chaos Shift, an Asteroids-like shooter. They’re currently working on EvilQuest 2, a sequel to their original hit.
  • Travis Gray
  • CHRISTMAS WITH THE SOFTER SIDE OF SEARS: Clockwise from top left: Chris Hamblin, Charlie Finch, Abby Wintker, Jesse Wagner.