See larger THE GUY IN THE BUSHES

The American student protest movement of the ’60s finally caught up with the University of Tennessee on January 15, 1970.
That was the day only 30 or so protesters gathered on The Hill because they were upset with the university for replacing popular UT president Andy Holt with Ed Boling. When legions of police showed up, the protest became not about the administration but about the police themselves.
“The guy in the bushes,” whose name was Ray Alexander, put it all in perspective with his “peace sign” flashed under the baton of police in full riot gear. 	
Dudenbostel’s photograph, which was picked up by the Associated Press and twice more by Esquire, has now been reprinted hundreds of times.
This means the iconic image of Ray Alexander, whom Don lost track of years ago, has lived on far beyond fading memories of the “riot” on The Hill at UT in 1970.
Ray, if you’re still out there, “peace, brother.”

photo by Don Dudenbostel

THE GUY IN THE BUSHES

The American student protest movement of the ’60s finally caught up with the University of Tennessee on January 15, 1970.
That was the day only 30 or so protesters gathered on The Hill because they were upset with the university for replacing popular UT president Andy Holt with Ed Boling. When legions of police showed up, the protest became not about the administration but about the police themselves.
“The guy in the bushes,” whose name was Ray Alexander, put it all in perspective with his “peace sign” flashed under the baton of police in full riot gear.
Dudenbostel’s photograph, which was picked up by the Associated Press and twice more by Esquire, has now been reprinted hundreds of times.
This means the iconic image of Ray Alexander, whom Don lost track of years ago, has lived on far beyond fading memories of the “riot” on The Hill at UT in 1970.
Ray, if you’re still out there, “peace, brother.”

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