GET RIGHT 
WITH GOD

You can still see admonitions like this, especially along roadways in the rural South. Whether the message is painted on roadside crosses or nailed to barns, “Get Right with God” means stop your sinful ways and get on better terms with God as imagined by the whoever put the sign up.
The part of the message that says “or else,” is strongly implied, so the phrase “or you’re going to hell” usually doesn’t need to be added.
This sign on the side of an old barn was photographed by Dudenbostel in the early ’70s along the back roads of Cocke County, a few miles outside of Newport. The rusted out truck is gone now and the part of the sign with “God” on it is falling down.

photo by Don Dudenbostel

GET RIGHT
WITH GOD

You can still see admonitions like this, especially along roadways in the rural South. Whether the message is painted on roadside crosses or nailed to barns, “Get Right with God” means stop your sinful ways and get on better terms with God as imagined by the whoever put the sign up.
The part of the message that says “or else,” is strongly implied, so the phrase “or you’re going to hell” usually doesn’t need to be added.
This sign on the side of an old barn was photographed by Dudenbostel in the early ’70s along the back roads of Cocke County, a few miles outside of Newport. The rusted out truck is gone now and the part of the sign with “God” on it is falling down.

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