Nothing to Fear?: The key year of 1932, when Franklin Roosevelt swept in to office in a landslide, brings out East Tennessee’s historically consistent Republicanism in sharp relief. In the depth of the Depression, East Tennesee—with a few exceptions, including Knox County—preferred to give Herbert Hoover a second try. Only six states, mostly in the Northeast, agreed. Despite its place in the Democratic “Solid South,” East Tennessee has tilted Republican, throughout major doctrinal changes in the party, since Reconstruction. The only exception was a little ironic: In 1912, most of East Tennessee forsook the Republican nominee in favor of the big-federal-government Progressive third-party candidate—albeit former Republican president—Theodore Roosevelt.

Nothing to Fear?: The key year of 1932, when Franklin Roosevelt swept in to office in a landslide, brings out East Tennessee’s historically consistent Republicanism in sharp relief. In the depth of the Depression, East Tennesee—with a few exceptions, including Knox County—preferred to give Herbert Hoover a second try. Only six states, mostly in the Northeast, agreed. Despite its place in the Democratic “Solid South,” East Tennessee has tilted Republican, throughout major doctrinal changes in the party, since Reconstruction. The only exception was a little ironic: In 1912, most of East Tennessee forsook the Republican nominee in favor of the big-federal-government Progressive third-party candidate—albeit former Republican president—Theodore Roosevelt.

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