• The Lazarus Project by Aleksander Hemon Published 7/16/2008 at 5:00 p.m. 0 comments

    Despite its mere 294 pages, Aleksandar Hemon’s The Lazarus Project appears to contain three times that. Launched from a historical moment in 1908, the novel provokes a dozen voices spanning a century and two continents. Additionally, The Lazarus Project is ...

  • The Reapers by John Connolly Published 7/16/2008 at 5:00 p.m. 0 comments

    John Connolly is easily one of the finest practitioners of the supernatural-tinged mystery story, with a series of books featuring the literally and metaphorically haunted P.I. Charlie Parker. Two of the supporting characters in that series now have a book ...

  • So, This is My Life... Published 7/2/2008 at 5:00 p.m. 0 comments

    Charles Maldonado goes where even angels fear to tread (angels over 17, at any rate)—the Young Adult section of a local bookstore. There, Charles considers some current examples of the genre, with input from his... younger self? We're starting to ...

  • Local Exerts' Opinions for Summer Reading Published 7/2/2008 at 4:11 p.m. 0 comments

    A few locals take the time to give us their insiders' short-lists on the topics they know best.

  • Hot Books Published 7/2/2008 at 12:18 p.m. 0 comments

    It's our annual summer reading issue: We've surveyed the hippest of Knoxville's (elusive) hiperati, and asked them what books are on their must-read list this year at the beach or on the lake or in the lawn chair. Be sure ...

  • All Things Must Fight to Live: Stories of War and Deliverance in Congo Published 6/18/2008 at 5:00 p.m. 0 comments

    Near the end of All Things Must Fight to Live: Stories of War and Deliverance in Congo, author and journalist Bryan Mealer describes breakfast in a train’s dining carriage as “one of my happiest moments. Because it was the first ...

  • The Price of Blood by Declan Hughes Published 6/4/2008 at 5:00 p.m. 0 comments

    Crime novels can be travel guides to a sense of place, a way to experience both the familiar and the unfamiliar through a grimy lens that just happens to rack its focus from the gutter. A city like Dublin, Ireland, ...

  • Chronicle of a Plague, Revisited (Da Capo Press) Published 6/4/2008 at 5:00 p.m. 0 comments

    In the early 1980s, Andrew Holleran wrote a column called New York Notebook for the magazine Christopher Street. His subject, at first, was gay New York. By 1982, when the AIDS crisis hit the city, that became his subject—the disease, ...

  • Small Favor: A Novel of the Dresden Files Published 5/21/2008 at 6:00 p.m. 0 comments

    What might have been considered a horror book a few years ago is now often considered “urban fantasy.” Urban fantasy novels tend to weave horror, romance, fantasy, and mystery into a gumbo of spicy provenance, but there’s so much of ...

  • A Journey Round My Skull (New York Review Books) Published 5/21/2008 at 6:00 p.m. 0 comments

    There’s a timely relevance to Hungarian writer Frigyes Karinthy’s 1939 memoir A Journey Round My Skull. TV’s medical mysteries have become our classical drama, their sequence of gore, gadgetry, and unconcealed patient disregard recalling Aristotelian unities. In Round My Skull, ...

  • On Her Majesty's Secret Service Published 5/7/2008 at 6:00 p.m. 0 comments

    Tara Chace, the protagonist of Greg Rucka’s Queen & Country series of espionage comics, has been shot, targeted by assassins, used by her bosses as bait for those same assassins, kidnapped and assaulted by Georgian terrorists, lost a former lover, ...

  • LA Outlaws (Dutton) Published 3/27/2008 at 6:31 p.m. 0 comments

    The California crime novel is a specialized trope of the genre, and it takes a special skill of painting with sunlight and noir to pull it off well. One of the best California mystery writers, T. Jefferson Parker, also happens ...

  • Riding Toward Everywhere (Ecco) Published 3/27/2008 at 6:26 p.m. 0 comments

    You might think William Vollmann’s latest, Riding Toward Everywhere, is about middle-aged hobo manqués hopping trains. As it happens, Riding contains a good deal of mid-life hobo tourism. That in itself is sort of interesting. But, Riding works best when ...

  • The Devil's Bones (HarperCollins) Published 3/13/2008 at 9:36 a.m. 0 comments

    Despite a lumbering opening paragraph that could win first prize in an Edward Bulwer-Lytton competition (“The last drop of daylight was fading from the western sky—a draining that seemed more a suffocation than a sunset, a final gasp as the ...

  • pulp (2008-11) Published 3/13/2008 at 12:00 a.m. 0 comments

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