Sholi Delivers a Little Rock with Its Texture

If their new self-titled album (on Touch & Go/Quarterstick) sounds a bit Deerhoof-like, it's because Greg Saunie produced it.

Sholi's meticulously rendered tunes usually defy the sandard verse-chorus-verse pattern in favor of a more nuanced sound designed to create tension and release.

Sholi's meticulously rendered tunes usually defy the sandard verse-chorus-verse pattern in favor of a more nuanced sound designed to create tension and release.

Sholi offers a sound that is, for my money, as much about textures as it’s about delivering the rock. The band resides somewhere in the amorphous territory where indie prog-rock overlaps with the art-pop sensibilities of acts like Deerhoof—which is really no surprise, since Sholi was produced by Deerhoof’s Greg Saunie. Alternately rocking and restrained, the band’s meticulously rendered tunes usually defy the standard verse-chorus-verse pattern in favor of a more nuanced sound designed to create tension and release. The album has its merits, but lacks either the fun or the sexiness that makes great rock ’n’ roll. Sholi requires an investment of its listeners, and I’m doubting that the payoff is really worth all the trouble.

© 2009 MetroPulse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments » 0

Be the first to post a comment!

Share your thoughts

Comments are the sole responsibility of the person posting them. You agree not to post comments that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or an invasion of privacy. Violators may be banned. Click here for our full user agreement.

Comments can be shared on Facebook and Yahoo!. Add both options by connecting your profiles.