ear (2006-50)

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You’re Late

Et Tu Susan?

The Heisman Consolation Prize Goes to…

Wait (Just) a Minute

Check Please

Bug in Our Ear

You’re Late

We tell you this now because advance tickets for the festival went on sale yesterday—you’re late. There will be a preliminary artist announcement sometime in January.

The event draws 80,000 people to Manchester, located off I-24 between Nashville and Chattanooga.

Et Tu Susan?

Alexander lost the minority whip position by one vote, after a preliminary headcount showed him winning. The two committed Alexander voters switched after heavy lobbying from Sen. John McCain , according to the Hill . McCain and Collins are close friends. Warner may have been nostalgic. He was a Trent Lott supporter for Majority Leader, but switched to Sen. Bill Frist at the last minute, ensuring Frist would replace Lott, after Lott was revealed to believe that America would have been better off if Dixiecrat candidate Strom Thurmond had been elected president instead of Harry Truman.

McCain, the proponent of campaign finance reform and government transparency, evidently feels the Senate is instead better off in the hands of old pols rather than reformers. The job of minority whip is to count heads, find votes and deliver them. Lott evidently had a better grasp of the votes on this one.

The Heisman Consolation Prize Goes to…

Judging by his long hair, hipster dress, and abstract conversation, the mustachioed library boss could pass for bassist for the most recent revival of the Moody Blues. (Some have offered to pay for him to get a haircut, and there are rumors that he has his price.)

Regardless of what the ball-cap pundits think of him, Frank’s fellow librarians respect him, and he’s made some changes at the library, sponsored downtown movie showings, added untraditional programs in the library, like jazz shows, and, as he comes up with more and more creative ways to deal with the limited space at old Lawson McGhee, he has continued to push for the construction of a new main library. Patronage is said to be higher than ever.

He also seems to be regarded well by his peers nationally. Frank is among the latest recipients of The New York Times Librarian Awards. More than 13,000 librarians nationwide were nominated for the award. Two committees of professional librarians culled the total down to 25. The awards are given by region, with heavier emphasis on the New York area; considering that 10 of them were in the New York area, and another three were specifically “academic” librarians, only 12 public librarians outside of greater New York, two from each of six regions, received the award. Frank was one.

They make selections by region, and our region is a little surprising: we’re apparently in the southeastern part of the“Midwest/Great Lakes” area. The other winner in this “region” was a librarian in Minnesota.

The award, which includes a $2,500 cash prize, was bestowed in New York Wednesday night. Mayor Mike Ragsdale will congratulate Frank in a special ceremony at the history center this Tuesday night.

Wait (Just) a Minute

Check Please

New Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade , the long time leader of the Smokies-supporting organization, attended the check presentation in Sevierville. Wade joked that with this kind of money on the table for the Smokies he had no doubt how the Supreme Court would have ruled had it come before them. Wade was joking with the crowd, the suit was settled locally, and lead counsel Gordon Ball and Circuit Judge Richard Vance came up with the idea of contributing the proceeds from the settlement to the Friends of the Smokies, rather than sending every consumer hurt by the price fixing a check for two cents.

Vance said an organization that supports a park visited by 9 million people a year seemed an appropriate way to reimburse the public for the price fixing.

Wade has left the board after his long time service, and the group is now headed by Mark Williams . Wade, the most recent appointment to the court by Gov. Phil Bredesen , arrived at the court in time to have a large stack of briefs on his desk—a decision is pending on term limits in Knox County and whether the Knox County Charter is valid.

© 2006 MetroPulse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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