ear (2005-35)

Just Don’t Go There

Biker Rallies, Revisited

Hairdresser to the Star

All Costs Not KUB’s

Knox Leader?

Bug in Our Ear

Just Don’t Go There

Knoxville City Council balked at the idea of spending money on an out-of-the-City County building site, with parking, for a one-stop service that doesn’t require developers to wander about the various city and county departments seeking permits.

Someone finally asked why, in 2005, builders needed to wander about collecting pieces of paper when companies are doing business around the world on the Internet. The city staff pointed out that they have had a long-ignored plan to set up a computerized permit tracking system, which would allow developers to file applications and get permits via computer, without ever having to visit the City County building.

The computer system will cost money, but is expected to cost less than moving city and county offices out into a free-standing building with parking. One wonders if county departments might catch on to this computer idea and if other services might be transacted via computer.

 

 

 

Biker Rallies, Revisited

That’s right—Robinella is named as a feature performer in the first Great Smoky Mountains Bent Fork Bikefest , along with a host of other local and national acts that would make any Harley Davidson aficionado proud. Organized by local motorcycling enthusiast Michael Branning and a handful of his buddies, the three-day festival will cater to the softer side of biker culture in addition to its leathery, traditional image.

“There’s something for everybody,” explains Branning. “Robinella isn’t really a motorcycle rally-type band, but this is more of a music festival. It’s a new style of motorcycle event.” It’ll be held Sept. 9-11 at the World’s Fair Park, and Branning expects 10,000 in attendance throughout the weekend.

He says he decided to launch his own festival after tiring of the stale, “rock burnout band” entertainment fare of the field rallies he has attended in the past. Which isn’t to say that Bent Fork will be devoid of manly-man activities—a bikini-clad dance squad, Ball of Steel stunt troupe and celebrity bike builders have been invited—but Branning hopes his festival will exhibit as much class as machismo.

 

 

 

Hairdresser to the Star

Messer, who says he was supposed to do the new mom’s highlights before she went on a recent trip, adds that he has heard the band’s new, soon-to-be-released disc and gives it high marks for continued originality. He suggests that, upon the disc’s release, the musical act may be known merely as Robinella.

 

 

 

All Costs Not KUB’s

As old sewers are replaced to stop leaks, KUB will also inspect the line that runs from the street to the house. The homeowner is responsible for the line that connects the house to the main sewer. In other words, if you have an older house connected to an old sewer that is being replaced, you may have to pay to repair any leaks in your portion of the system. The costs can range from $500 to $1,600. KUB has begun notifying customers and has mailed out a brochure and a letter.

KUB and the Knoxville-Knox County Community Action Committee has a grant program for low-income homeowners;  applications are available at CAC. KUB also has a no-interest loan program run by CAC. The grants and loans can be used to repair “laterals” between the home and the sewer.

If you have your gutters or an underground sump pump tied into your sewer line you should also be prepared to disconnect it. The purpose of the program is to get rainwater out of the sewer system.

 

 

 

Knox Leader?

State Rep. Harry Brooks , R-Knoxville, is considered to have a good shot at the job. Brooks is running against two candidates from the Memphis area, state Rep. Paul Stanley and state Rep. Curry Todd . Then there is state Rep. Glen Casada , from middle Tennessee.

It will take 23 votes from the Republican caucus to elect a minority leader. After each vote in which no one gets 23 the candidate with the lowest number of votes drops out. This continues until the magic number is achieved. Minority Leader is a time consuming job that requires organizational and planning skills. All the candidates have support, some based on geography, some on issues, but most members will probably be looking for someone that can “set the table” and have the Republicans organized in the event they take over the House. Brooks is highly regarded by his colleagues for being levelheaded, sensible and a workhorse.

Things might get complicated, however, if state Rep. Bill Dunn , R-Knoxville, decides to get back in the race. Many of Dunn’s potential supporters have committed to Brooks since Dunn indicated he might not seek the post. But Dunn is said to be reconsidering. His candidacy would present a problem for the Knox delegation, choosing between the two.

Bug in Our Ear

© 2005 MetroPulse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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