ear (2005-34)

Tolls for Thee?

Frost-ed Off

Flighty Ain’t He?

Shattered Krystal

HeatFest 2005

Bug in Our Ear

Tolls for Thee?

Hultquist and Knoxvillian Jim Ullrich , with Railroad Solutions, argued for a proposal from Norfolk Southern railroad to improve rail service and load truck trailers on rail cars to ship them around the country, rather than build additional interstate lanes. Hultquist and Jeff Welch , of Knoxville’s Transportation Planning Organization, argued that the I-81 proposal affects several states and should not be Virginia’s decision to make. They suggested that the Federal Highway Administration should take over the project. Virginia is proceeding with a plan in which the state will partner with a subsidiary of Haliburton to build additional lanes on I-81, financed by tolls.

Hultquist says considering that I-40 runs through the center of downtown Knoxville, a national program to add truck lanes to interstates has the city “looking down the barrel of the shotgun.” House Transportation Chairman Don Young is pushing a national plan to add additional lanes, financed by tolls, to the interstate system for truck traffic.

 

 

 

Frost-ed Off

Richard Cate was once the director of the Downtown Organization but left the post to go into private business. He resurfaced in public life recently working under contract for the Homebuilders Association of Knoxville and other clients. He lent a hand to County Mayor Mike Ragsdale in the campaign to defeat the referendum to repeal the wheel tax (the alternative being a property tax which homebuilders opposed).

Cate is currently directing the campaign for City Council candidate Kim Litton , who is running against Frost. Cate says the homebuilders don’t have anything to lose opposing a sitting councilman because “he won’t return our phone calls.” Both Litton and Frost will proceed beyond the district primary to a citywide race where turnout is expected to be light.

 

 

 

Flighty Ain’t He?

Boortz’s radio harangue is carried in Knoxville on The Big Talker (FM100.3). He’s on a national tour promoting his book on the Flat Tax, a plan that would abolish the Internal Revenue Service and substitute the income tax with a national sales tax. It has been No. 1 on the New York Times non-fiction list.

 

 

 

Shattered Krystal

 

 

 

HeatFest 2005

At least the fair park’s giant fountains came in handy to hundreds of kids and not a few ouzo-emboldened adults who may not have come to a Greek festival expecting to get sopping wet. The marketplace, in an outside tent last year, was shifted to the air-conditioned interior of the old convention center.

A few well-traveled folks remarked, “It feels like Greece,” but in fact Knoxville’s slightly closer to the equator than Greece is. This weekend, you could tell.

Saturday, lines for souvlaki and gyros and spanakopita and saganaki were uncharacteristically short until the sun went down and shadows stretched across the fair site, and the lines followed them, filling the shady spots as they developed.

At the end of the weekend, paid admission was about 8,200, with a total admission, counting kids and friends, of well over 10,000. That sounds like a lot to us, but some participants admit they were hoping for more.

Bug in Our Ear

© 2005 MetroPulse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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